Grounded & Steadfast

The journal of Chris Bowler, a collection of thoughts on faith, business, design, and the creative process. Also working on Idea Cafe.

Less

Judging from the number of links I've seen to The Best, Dustin Curtis obviously touched on an idea that resounded with many folks. If you haven't read it, he makes a great case for buying the absolute best with every purchase. I also agree with this idea — purchases where I've followed suit have always lasted and their usage increases the enjoyment as they age. You even develop a fondness for these items (and their brands, usually) over time.

However, I can't help but add two thoughts for making purchases in such a manner. First, the reason is not elitism. I am not what I consume (and neither are you). I hate to think that I used to purchase things so I would be perceived in a certain light. And I hope I'm past that now.

Second, purchasing in such a manner should mean less purchasing, over time. It's easy to succumb to the thinking that getting the best is too expensive. It is expensive in the moment, but not in the long term. The reason is twofold; I'll take more time to make a decision, and sometimes that means not making a purchase at all. And of course, if you buy quality, it lasts. Both factors reduce your consumption.